Project Badwater: Revenant by Erikas Perl

Project Badwater: Revenant by
Erikas
Perl

Death? by hyun lee

Death? by hyun
lee

Infernal Reckoning – Magic the Gathering conce…

Infernal Reckoning – Magic the
Gathering concept by Bram
Sels

johnny-dynamo: And A Child Shall Lead Them… by…

johnny-dynamo:

And A Child Shall Lead Them… by Wolfblood31

King’s rest by LozanoX

King’s rest by LozanoX

Creepypasta #1525: Weird shit I’ve seen as a M…

Length: Long

The
next morning after being evacuated, everyone was obviously exhausted and a few
guys were sick with pneumonia. Being wet, cold, and nearly scared to death
really took a toll. I don’t think the ‘incident’ with the thing outside our
tents was talked about in large groups, but it was definitely talked about off
on the side. A few guys maintained the fact that it was just a great big prank
and laughed it off, but whenever they laughed… it was like they were asking for
some form of validation.

Even
in the rear, we were kept busy cleaning weapons and gear and getting ready for
whatever is next. Our unit has an unexplainable obsession with ‘training’ and
it really cut into our morale, but it made time go by fast. Life seemed pretty
normal despite the weather. I stayed indoors at all times unless we were
exercising. I didn’t have the heart to tell anyone that it was probably
watching us from the trees. Even if I didn’t feel ‘it’.

The
farthest I had ventured was maybe a week after coming down the mountain. The
base has a small store with an inventory identical to a gas station. I’d gotten
tired of what they were feeding us and my mind had started to rationalize all
of my fear away. So I went. Nothing crazy happened, but I did however notice
there were people there who were definitely not Marines. These guys were big,
burly, and sported full beards. I pretended to look at the selection of Doritos
and caught a glimpse of a very particular Trident tattoo. This meant that
whoever this person was a Navy SEAL… currently or at some point. I wonder about
the other guys?

I
approached the bearded guy and simply asked him if he was a SEAL. When he
turned around to look at me, he simply looked at me and said:

“Yeah,
sure, how’d you know?”

“The
tattoo is a dead give away. I used to see my college roommate hang all that
moto (motivational) shit up in his room.”

“Oh
really?” was all he said

I
didn’t know what to say but I wanted to impress him…

“He’s
actually a SEAL now…”

His
demeanor got a little friendlier.

“Oh
shit, what’s his name?”

“Kurtz,
he’s an officer.”

“Is
his first name Walter?”

“Yeah,
it is, do you know him?”

“Do
I know him? He’s outside smoking a cigarette.”

A
little info on my friend:

We worked out alot together as we
both had a sick fascination with pain. Either running, hiking, or swimming. We
would torture ourselves nearly every day until he left. I kept up with him as
he went through all the training cycles, then he just disappeared. I’m talking
GONE on every fucking form of social media. I talked to his parents and
all they got from him was the occasional letter. It always
bothered the hell out of me that he straight up disappeared from the world
without saying a damn thing. I thought about it nearly every day. There he was,
outside, and all I wanted to do was get one good punch in.

Navy
SEAL or not, he’s still a dick.

When we stepped outside and I saw
him, I still hated his guts, but I had a feeling that Me vs. A bunch of
SEALs probablywasn’t going to work… despite having the power of God
and Anime on my side.

He
didn’t even notice me until I’d said his name. In any other setting, I probably
should have saluted since he was an officer and I was enlisted scum, but I
didn’t give a shit. He seemed genuinely happy to see me and wouldn’t let go of
my hand. We did some catching up, mostly questions from him about my boring
life. Whenever I’d ask him stuff, he would deflect and make a joke or give me a
word answer. The man just wouldn’t elaborate about what he’s been up to.

After
about 10 minutes of talking, the group of them decided they were just about
done stocking up on Mountain Dew and gummy worms. Before they headed back,
Kurtz pulled me aside and threw his cigarette to the ground. With a look of
complete concern and worry, he said:

“Listen,
035none, you really shouldn’t go back up there. This ain’t the place you want
to be. You understand?.”

I
wasn’t really sure what to say, I just nodded solemnly before he shook my hand
and left. That was the last time I’ve been able to talk to him since. One thing
to note is that the group of guys didn’t all have beards or tattoos. Don’t get
me wrong here, but Navy guys have a certain look. I can’t explain it unless
you’ve been around them long enough, but not everyone in that group was a SEAL.
I saw a guy wearing an Army related shirt so I’m assuming they were some form
of cross-branch team.

Anyway,
I headed back to the concrete hotels and spent some time reading. Just trying
to get my mind off what he had said. Should I break my ankle or pretend to be
sick? They don’t have Uber here and the highway is quite some distance away…

Ultimately,
I decided that my pride was more important than my life. I ended up going back
into the mountains. I felt nothing but dread. Here I was being stalked and
harrassed by some THING. And on top of that, the Marine Corps is destroying my
body everyday. The human body isn’t designed to hike 175km in a week with
200lbs of gear. Let alone up MOUNTAINS.

However,
sometimes you get a break. The hikes were relatively short and all we did was
practice our rock climbing skills at night. After about 3 weeks in these
mountains, my body had started to get used to the altitude and the amount of
physical activity we were doing. I was counting down the days in my head every
few minutes. Making quick calculations and crunching the numbers on each
activity and how much closer I am to safety.

Things
weren’t going to be that easy of course. I had a pretty decent amount of
anxiety and dread this entire time, but I rationalized that it was just my mind
I didn’t notice until the third day, when we peaked one of the larger
mountains, that we were headed for Devil’s Incline. It had to be a mistake,
because the compasses were acting weird, right? I talked to a few of the higher
up’s and sure enough, that was our final destination. Because the CO thought it
would be a challenge.

Great.
They’re leading us straight to our deaths. Dulce et decorum est kind of deal.
The closer we got there, the worse I felt about this whole thing. I couldn’t
sleep for more than 10 minutes because I swear I could feel it watching me. Not
wanting to go crazy, I confided with my squad leader and all he said was “Yeah,
I felt it. Don’t wanna talk about it.”

The
next day, we were brief on our final training exercise. Our job was to assault
to the peak of Devil’s Incline. The vast majority of it would be climbed using
carabiners and rope and traditional techniques. The final 500 meters is mostly
gravel and can be traversed on foot. We would be provided ‘overwatch’ by
special forces operating in the area. Nothing new. The military is imaginative.
If we see them, ignore them.

We
begin the assault at sunset and get to the middle of the mountain around
midnight. Everything is going smooth, we’re climbing the cliffs slowly and
methodically. On one particularly large cliff, I set up one of the anchor
points so that Marines can rappel from another side of the cliff. I turn around
and head for the next cliff. Before I start to climb, someone angrily asks me
why the hell I cut the line and that I could’ve gotten someone killed. I
respond that I didn’t cut the line and head back to see what the hell happened.

The
rope was sliced perfectly. Like surgically almost. If you’ve ever cut climbing
rope before, you’ll know that it’s almost impossible to get such a clean cut. You’ll
always have a tiny bit of fraying, even with the sharpest of knives. This rope
has no fraying at all. I’m assuming that it was this same thing that’s been
harrassing us all month. Trying it’s best to kill us.

Fortunately,
there weren’t many cliffs after that. The 500m slope of gravel turned out to be
way too steep to hike straight up. Also, out of nowhere, a blizzard decided to
make our lives hell. To this day, I’ve never seen such terrible weather. We’re
talking 70mph winds, whiteout conditions, everything. It was insane. On the way
up, I swore I was going to freeze to death. The slope seemed like it would
never end.

After
about 3 hours, someone had mentioned that multiple Marines were missing. Our
first reaction was to stop and SIT THERE for an hour and then send half of us
back down in an attempt to find these Marines. That was the coldest I’d ever
been in my life. At least hiking provided some warmth, but sitting there being
buried alive in snow and wind… it was bad.

I
don’t know who made the call to keep pushing forward to the top, but it was the
only way anyone was going to survive. There was a road on the other side of the
mountain with vehicles most likely waiting for us. There was no use kicking
around any more for Marines in the snow because things were just getting worse.
Pretty much everyone had some form of frostbite. We just didn’t have the right
gear to protect ourselves.

Finally, we get to the top and
thankfully there are tents waiting for us. The tent I’d got was broken so I
ended up piling in with a bunch of other guys like a bunch of sardines. What a
shitshow that was setting up in the wind. They gave us maybe
20 minutes while they figured out what to do about the missing guys. I am
assuming they called the proper authorities way before that. It was way too
windy for helicopters and nearly impossible for even us to search the area. The
wrong gust of wind could literally blow us down the mountain, tumbling
facefirst.

Their
solution was to first use our thermal optics from the top and search for the
guys. Nothing. Then we all got on a big line and held hands as we walked down
the mountain. Nothing. Granted, we didn’t bring our 200lbs of crap with us so
it was ALOT easier walking back up. By now, it was 4am and it seemed to be
getting worse. They told us to go back our tents and warm up for 20 minutes
because guys were literally turning into zombies.

Now,
this is quite possibly the weirdest part. For the next 12 hours, no one
remembers what the hell happened. Everyone woke up in their tents and have 0
recollection. It was day time now and everywhere was covered in snow. A few of
the special forces guys (including Kurtz) were talking to all of my higher up’s
about something.

I
didn’t find out until later that the SF dudes found all of our missing guys at
various locations. Not 30km far, but much shorter distances like 5-10km. Ears
bleeding too. While that’s not impossible to hike in a few hours, it’s kind of
damn hard to get lost on a mountain where your only objective is to go up. Not
to the side or around or down. Up dammit.

We
radio’d that in and the basecamp sent special vehicles designed for the snow to
get them. They kinda resembled half-tracks. The same day, they loaded us up on
these special snow trucks and told us we were going back to the barracks. When
we got there, we got debriefed on how successful our mission was and some BS
about accountability of guys. Blah blah. In any other situation, they would
have lost their jobs if they lost a Marine. Just not in Bridgeport I guess.

We
packed up our bags that night and got woken up around 3am to get on a bus back
to desert. I was extremely relieved to be back. No one ever really talked about
our time there again. The guys who disappeared always came back from the
hospital saying they don’t remember anything or that they don’t want to talk
about it.

Never
go to Bridgeport folks.

Credits
to: 035none (story)

The Thing by AngusBurgers

The Thing by AngusBurgers

Photo

Photo

Cover for Rising Rebels by Image by ryanbrown-…

Cover for Rising Rebels by Image by ryanbrown-colour

35 58 67

35 58 67

35. What is your number one kink?
I have a strong kink for being helpless
58. How big is to big?
When its not enjoyable
67. What is your sexual super power?
I dont believe I have one, or i do but dont actually realize it